Cover Focus | Mar/Apr '17

ECCE Leads to Glued IOL

A 95-year-old man presented with an IOL that had dislocated into the anterior chamber. This was causing an acute rise in intraocular pressure as well as ocular pain, prompting us to head into the operating room to remove the IOL.

Interestingly, once in the operating room, the patient’s crystalline lens had dislocated into the mid-vitreous. I performed a three-port vitrectomy, followed by extracapsular cataract extraction. I used a viscoelastic cannula through the inferior trocar, injecting viscoelastic to expulse the lens from the eye. This patient had phacomorphic glaucoma, and the IOL had actually ruptured inside the eye and was up against the cornea until the patient was laid flat.

TIP

Prior to surgery, the decision was made to consider putting a lens in the eye if at all possible, so a glued IOL procedure was subsequently performed.

Prior to surgery, the decision was made to consider putting a lens in the eye if at all possible. A glued IOL procedure was subsequently performed, and the patient did wonderfully in the immediate postoperative period.

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